Pulverbatch

The Church of St Edith occupies a prominent position in the village and is set in an elevated circular graveyard. This would lend support to suggestions that its origins stretch back to medieval or even earlier times as it could have been the site of hill fort.

The church's first known priest was 'John the Chaplain', recorded before 1193 and it began life as a daughter site to Pontesbury before being destroyed by Welsh raiders around 1400. It was rebuilt in the next century and substantially restored in 1773. The present church was rebuilt in 1853, but the west tower dates back to 1773. The tower was built in a classical style and includes a parapet with urns to the corners above a corbelled moulded cornice. On its south side is a clock with painted numerals, possibly also dating back to 1773. It is on account of this fine tower that the church has been designated a Grade II* listed building. The centenary of the rebuilding was celebrated on the day after coronation day in 1953.

The Circular churchyard, a defensive site, has some listed gravestones, excellent urn monument, Canadian war grave and Sukey Harley’s grave. (See  True Gospel Ministries - Sukey Harley)

Read more about St Edith's church.